Anxiety & Phobias

When you are anxious the world feels like a scary and dangerous place. If you have a phobia, it is only a matter of time before you are hijacked by your trigger. The anticipation is exhausting, and there is no freedom in living this way. The good news is that there is a permanent way out of this situation. Neurofeedback at the Brain Training Centre offers you a simple and effective way of rewiring your brain so you are no longer at the mercy of a hijacked nervous system.

We know that anxiety is not 'attention seeking’, nor an excuse to ‘get out of things’. These judgements are offensive and unhelpful, serving only to compound the issue. What anxiety actual reveals to us is that the parts of your brain controlling stress reactions – and therefore your ability to remain calm – are out of balance. The toll it takes on you is significant, and chances are you're already exhausted. You deserve a better life, so it is important that you take action today.

Social phobia, fear of public speaking, generalised anxiety, panic attacks; these and other anxiety disorders are issues resulting from dysregulated neural networks, which can be rewired and thus your symptoms resolved. 

All assessments at the Brain Training Centre are completely tailored to you. We do this to maximise your results in the shortest possible time. Imagine feeling safe, confident and free to live your best life.

Contact us the Brain Training Centre for an appointment today and teach your brain to be calm again.

EVIDENCE BASED RESEARCH FOR THE EFFECTIVENESS OF NEUROTHERAPY FOR ANXIETY, PTSD (POST TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER) AND SLEEP.

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DISCLAIMER:

All articles, documents and publications mentioned by or linked by this site or hosted at this site have been provided by The International Society for Neurofeedback and Research (ISNR) as a public service. There is absolutely no endorsement by ISNR of any statement made in any of these documents, articles, or publications. Expect to see differences of opinion between authors. That is the essence of free and open scientific study.

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